Saana Waitai Murray

Saana, our Ngati Kuri kuia and mother of 13 was the last of the original claimants for the Wai 262 “flora and fauna” claim to the Waitangi Tribunal.

“At its heart, she told people it was about “Maori control of things Maori.”

The claim is solely for the Tangata Whenua (people of Aotearoa – New Zealand) and refers to the second article of the Treaty of Waitangi. We had no right to let what our ancestors had naturally inherited to any foreign government to control.  The claim is for all our forest. The Manuka is one of our Taonga used for its medicinal purposes, by our Tupuna (ancestors) and is the mountain stabiliser of our lands.

With the recent arrival of the Manuka honey industry our people of Northland have been buzzing with excitement and joy as they have been given the chance to acquire health, wealth, and education through the natural untouched Manuka forest, which we as the descendants have inherited from our ancestors.”

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Whaea Saana Murray and whanau sing a few waiata

“Our grandmother served the role of mana wahine in every court of Maori society. She had that much mana she was considered to be a living taonga by everybody around her. She lived her life in a way which left no-one in any doubt about her pride in her people of Te Hiku o te Ika and in particular Ngati Kuri.”

In this short video whaea Saana Murray and whanau sing a few waiata from Te Hiku o Te Ika, and share a bit of Ngāti Kuri history.

Rapine Murray

Rapine Murray is the youngest child of Saana Waitai Murray & Nicolas Murray, late husband to Mata Murray, and father to Samson, Blanche, Tae, Walter, Mabel & Sobieski was a strong caring and devoted man.

Anyone who knew Rapine, would say that he was a loving, caring and devoted husband and father. His loyal, trustworthy, humorous and charming personality would see him working alongside people from all walks of life on various projects such as, Youth & Police Engagement, Iwi Delegation and International Indigenous Groups.

In 1986 Rapine and his wife would see themselves start various business ventures. Such as Oyster Farming, Off the beaten track mini tours on the tribal lands of Muriwhenua, and Private Corporate Security.

Always seeking an opportunity to better himself and his family, he ventured into the Honey Industry in 2005. Rapine saw the honey industry as great opportunity for his family to manage, own and operate a successful sustainable Maori business in Te Tai Tokerau.

Without any doubt; Rapine would be proud of his wife & children with the growing global success of Kai Ora Honey Ltd.

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